Hiding email addresses from harvesters

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
22 messages Options
12
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Patrick Larkin-2
Hi -

Does anyone know how these spam harvesters work?  The email administrator freaks whenever I put email accounts on a website but it's nearly impossible to conduct business to expect people to know how to edit out "AT" with a @ or some other silly method.  

I see examples on constructing the email address using javascript or using ASCII codes to construct the "mailto" URL.  But they all seem to assemble the "mailto" URL.  For instance, the ASCII code method works if the harvester is just reading source but if it's actually following and recording the links, it will get the fully assembled email address.

So, has anyone done anything interesting with Lasso to obfuscate email addresses?  I thought about just making a Lasso-based form but there's too much potential for abuse given our clientele.  

Patrick
#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Carl Ketterling
I can't be sure, but I believe that anything you can do to encode an
email address can be easily decoded by a harvester.  If you're running a
business, expect to have email addressed found by spammers.  I focus on
spam filtering rather than on hiding email addresses.

Carl

In response to this text from Patrick Larkin ([hidden email])
sent on Monday, June 25, 2012 at 4:12 PM (-0400):

>Hi -
>
>Does anyone know how these spam harvesters work?  The email
>administrator freaks whenever I put email accounts on a website but it's
>nearly impossible to conduct business to expect people to know how to
>edit out "AT" with a @ or some other silly method.  
>
>I see examples on constructing the email address using javascript or
>using ASCII codes to construct the "mailto" URL.  But they all seem to
>assemble the "mailto" URL.  For instance, the ASCII code method works if
>the harvester is just reading source but if it's actually following and
>recording the links, it will get the fully assembled email address.
>
>So, has anyone done anything interesting with Lasso to obfuscate email
>addresses?  I thought about just making a Lasso-based form but there's
>too much potential for abuse given our clientele.  
>
>Patrick
>#############################################################
>This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>  the mailing list Lasso
>[hidden email]
>To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>


#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Doug Gentry-2
I'm generally with Carl on this, but there is a difference in scenarios...

If I put an email address up on a web site that is mine, or controlled be me, I'm taking on the burden of spam filtering, and I weigh the costs of that against the convenience of having the email address.

If I am displaying a number of email addresses, for people not as directly connected to me, then I believe the burden falls on me to protect their addresses. That's when I start using contact forms or other database-driven tools to let a visitor communicate with those people.

...Doug

On Jun 25, 2012, at 1:28 PM, Carl Ketterling wrote:

> I can't be sure, but I believe that anything you can do to encode an
> email address can be easily decoded by a harvester.  If you're running a
> business, expect to have email addressed found by spammers.  I focus on
> spam filtering rather than on hiding email addresses.
>
> Carl
>
> In response to this text from Patrick Larkin ([hidden email])
> sent on Monday, June 25, 2012 at 4:12 PM (-0400):
>
>> Hi -
>>
>> Does anyone know how these spam harvesters work?  The email
>> administrator freaks whenever I put email accounts on a website but it's
>> nearly impossible to conduct business to expect people to know how to
>> edit out "AT" with a @ or some other silly method.  
>>
>> I see examples on constructing the email address using javascript or
>> using ASCII codes to construct the "mailto" URL.  But they all seem to
>> assemble the "mailto" URL.  For instance, the ASCII code method works if
>> the harvester is just reading source but if it's actually following and
>> recording the links, it will get the fully assembled email address.
>>
>> So, has anyone done anything interesting with Lasso to obfuscate email
>> addresses?  I thought about just making a Lasso-based form but there's
>> too much potential for abuse given our clientele.  
>>
>> Patrick
>> #############################################################
>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>> the mailing list Lasso
>> [hidden email]
>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>
>
> #############################################################
> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>  the mailing list Lasso
> [hidden email]
> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>


---
Doug Gentry
Dynapolis & Southern Oregon University
p:  541-261-8501
[hidden email]
www.dynapolis.com - blog: www.plain-sense.com



#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Jim Sheffer-3
In reply to this post by Carl Ketterling
Patrick-

I agree with Carl - Expect to have the email address found by spammers.

The only "safe" way I've found is to use a form to send emails back to the client and that's not always the best way to go.

Of course, I'm one of those that believes that almost ANY hoops requiring the client (visitor) to jump through are bad business.  The idea of making a potential client jump through hoops so I can run my email server a little easier seems ridiculous (I hope this doesn't start some type of "war" on the subject)!
Same with "Captcha" - I can't stand sites that force me to go through that step and if I can avoid it, I'll find another company to deal with!

I understand their usefulness but don't agree that I should be the one to pay for wanting to do business with you!



James Sheffer,

The HigherPowered Team!

[hidden email]          [hidden email]
Web Design & Development             http://www.higherpowered.com
phone:  469-256-0268                      
 "We help businesses succeed on the web!"
         -------------------------------------------

On Jun 25, 2012, at 3:28 PM, Carl Ketterling wrote:

> I can't be sure, but I believe that anything you can do to encode an
> email address can be easily decoded by a harvester.  If you're running a
> business, expect to have email addressed found by spammers.  I focus on
> spam filtering rather than on hiding email addresses.
>
> Carl
>
> In response to this text from Patrick Larkin ([hidden email])
> sent on Monday, June 25, 2012 at 4:12 PM (-0400):
>
>> Hi -
>>
>> Does anyone know how these spam harvesters work?  The email
>> administrator freaks whenever I put email accounts on a website but it's
>> nearly impossible to conduct business to expect people to know how to
>> edit out "AT" with a @ or some other silly method.  
>>
>> I see examples on constructing the email address using javascript or
>> using ASCII codes to construct the "mailto" URL.  But they all seem to
>> assemble the "mailto" URL.  For instance, the ASCII code method works if
>> the harvester is just reading source but if it's actually following and
>> recording the links, it will get the fully assembled email address.
>>
>> So, has anyone done anything interesting with Lasso to obfuscate email
>> addresses?  I thought about just making a Lasso-based form but there's
>> too much potential for abuse given our clientele.  
>>
>> Patrick
>> #############################################################
>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>> the mailing list Lasso
>> [hidden email]
>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>
>
> #############################################################
> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>  the mailing list Lasso
> [hidden email]
> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>

#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Patrick Larkin-2
Thanks.  Well we are not a "business" but we have thousands of employees.  And the fact that half of them are teachers and principals, I'm not too keen on the anonymity of a form email system.  I know it will be abused.  

So the dilemma continues...



On Jun 25, 2012, at 4:46 PM, Jim Sheffer <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Patrick-
>
> I agree with Carl - Expect to have the email address found by spammers.
>
> The only "safe" way I've found is to use a form to send emails back to the client and that's not always the best way to go.
>
> Of course, I'm one of those that believes that almost ANY hoops requiring the client (visitor) to jump through are bad business.  The idea of making a potential client jump through hoops so I can run my email server a little easier seems ridiculous (I hope this doesn't start some type of "war" on the subject)!
> Same with "Captcha" - I can't stand sites that force me to go through that step and if I can avoid it, I'll find another company to deal with!
>
> I understand their usefulness but don't agree that I should be the one to pay for wanting to do business with you!
>
>
>
> James Sheffer,
>
> The HigherPowered Team!
>
> [hidden email]          [hidden email]
> Web Design & Development             http://www.higherpowered.com
> phone:  469-256-0268                      
> "We help businesses succeed on the web!"
>         -------------------------------------------
>
> On Jun 25, 2012, at 3:28 PM, Carl Ketterling wrote:
>
>> I can't be sure, but I believe that anything you can do to encode an
>> email address can be easily decoded by a harvester.  If you're running a
>> business, expect to have email addressed found by spammers.  I focus on
>> spam filtering rather than on hiding email addresses.
>>
>> Carl
>>
>> In response to this text from Patrick Larkin ([hidden email])
>> sent on Monday, June 25, 2012 at 4:12 PM (-0400):
>>
>>> Hi -
>>>
>>> Does anyone know how these spam harvesters work?  The email
>>> administrator freaks whenever I put email accounts on a website but it's
>>> nearly impossible to conduct business to expect people to know how to
>>> edit out "AT" with a @ or some other silly method.  
>>>
>>> I see examples on constructing the email address using javascript or
>>> using ASCII codes to construct the "mailto" URL.  But they all seem to
>>> assemble the "mailto" URL.  For instance, the ASCII code method works if
>>> the harvester is just reading source but if it's actually following and
>>> recording the links, it will get the fully assembled email address.
>>>
>>> So, has anyone done anything interesting with Lasso to obfuscate email
>>> addresses?  I thought about just making a Lasso-based form but there's
>>> too much potential for abuse given our clientele.  
>>>
>>> Patrick
>>> #############################################################
>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>> [hidden email]
>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>
>>
>> #############################################################
>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>> the mailing list Lasso
>> [hidden email]
>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>
> #############################################################
> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>  the mailing list Lasso
> [hidden email]
> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>
#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

RE: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Rick Draper-2
Hi Patrick,

We work the layers of protection principle - yes on the Internet, if you can see it, you can have it, but by using some css and jQuery/JavaScript magic (originally posted on this list - sorry I can't recall by who.. Chris Wik??), you can raise the bar for harvesting...

Email: <a class="enc_value">[encode_base64('[hidden email])]</a>

When the page renders, the base64 encoded email address appears normally..

        // decodes obfuscated e-mails
        $(". enc_value ").each(function(){
                var addr = $.base64Decode($(this).text());
                $(this).attr("href", "mailto:" + addr).text(addr);
        });

Very best regards,

Rick


#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Carl Ketterling
In reply to this post by Patrick Larkin-2
I agree with Patrick.  I didn't think about addresses where I don't
maintain the email server, too.

I'd be happy to swap ideas with your email administrator -- or if
there's enough interest here, maybe the conversation could be on this
list for a short time.

Carl

In response to this text from Patrick Larkin ([hidden email])
sent on Monday, June 25, 2012 at 4:55 PM (-0400):

>Thanks.  Well we are not a "business" but we have thousands of
>employees.  And the fact that half of them are teachers and principals,
>I'm not too keen on the anonymity of a form email system.  I know it
>will be abused.  
>
>So the dilemma continues...
>
>
>
>On Jun 25, 2012, at 4:46 PM, Jim Sheffer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Patrick-
>>
>> I agree with Carl - Expect to have the email address found by spammers.
>>
>> The only "safe" way I've found is to use a form to send emails back to
>the client and that's not always the best way to go.
>>
>> Of course, I'm one of those that believes that almost ANY hoops
>requiring the client (visitor) to jump through are bad business.  The
>idea of making a potential client jump through hoops so I can run my
>email server a little easier seems ridiculous (I hope this doesn't start
>some type of "war" on the subject)!
>> Same with "Captcha" - I can't stand sites that force me to go through
>that step and if I can avoid it, I'll find another company to deal with!
>>
>> I understand their usefulness but don't agree that I should be the one
>to pay for wanting to do business with you!
>>
>>
>>
>> James Sheffer,
>>
>> The HigherPowered Team!
>>
>> [hidden email]          [hidden email]
>> Web Design & Development             http://www.higherpowered.com
>> phone:  469-256-0268                      
>> "We help businesses succeed on the web!"
>>         -------------------------------------------
>>
>> On Jun 25, 2012, at 3:28 PM, Carl Ketterling wrote:
>>
>>> I can't be sure, but I believe that anything you can do to encode an
>>> email address can be easily decoded by a harvester.  If you're running a
>>> business, expect to have email addressed found by spammers.  I focus on
>>> spam filtering rather than on hiding email addresses.
>>>
>>> Carl
>>>
>>> In response to this text from Patrick Larkin ([hidden email])
>>> sent on Monday, June 25, 2012 at 4:12 PM (-0400):
>>>
>>>> Hi -
>>>>
>>>> Does anyone know how these spam harvesters work?  The email
>>>> administrator freaks whenever I put email accounts on a website but it's
>>>> nearly impossible to conduct business to expect people to know how to
>>>> edit out "AT" with a @ or some other silly method.  
>>>>
>>>> I see examples on constructing the email address using javascript or
>>>> using ASCII codes to construct the "mailto" URL.  But they all seem to
>>>> assemble the "mailto" URL.  For instance, the ASCII code method works if
>>>> the harvester is just reading source but if it's actually following and
>>>> recording the links, it will get the fully assembled email address.
>>>>
>>>> So, has anyone done anything interesting with Lasso to obfuscate email
>>>> addresses?  I thought about just making a Lasso-based form but there's
>>>> too much potential for abuse given our clientele.  
>>>>
>>>> Patrick
>>>> #############################################################
>>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>>> [hidden email]
>>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>>
>>>
>>> #############################################################
>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>> [hidden email]
>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>
>> #############################################################
>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>  the mailing list Lasso
>> [hidden email]
>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>
>#############################################################
>This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>  the mailing list Lasso
>[hidden email]
>To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>


#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Jim Sheffer-3
In reply to this post by Patrick Larkin-2
Patrick-

In the form, come up with a question that they can easily answer (but a bot would not know).

Combine that with a time/date stamp and you are on your way to creating a safe email form :-)

James Sheffer,

The HigherPowered Team!

[hidden email]          [hidden email]
Web Design & Development             http://www.higherpowered.com
phone:  469-256-0268                      
 "We help businesses succeed on the web!"
         -------------------------------------------

On Jun 25, 2012, at 3:55 PM, Patrick Larkin wrote:

> Thanks.  Well we are not a "business" but we have thousands of employees.  And the fact that half of them are teachers and principals, I'm not too keen on the anonymity of a form email system.  I know it will be abused.  
>
> So the dilemma continues...
>
>
>
> On Jun 25, 2012, at 4:46 PM, Jim Sheffer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Patrick-
>>
>> I agree with Carl - Expect to have the email address found by spammers.
>>
>> The only "safe" way I've found is to use a form to send emails back to the client and that's not always the best way to go.
>>
>> Of course, I'm one of those that believes that almost ANY hoops requiring the client (visitor) to jump through are bad business.  The idea of making a potential client jump through hoops so I can run my email server a little easier seems ridiculous (I hope this doesn't start some type of "war" on the subject)!
>> Same with "Captcha" - I can't stand sites that force me to go through that step and if I can avoid it, I'll find another company to deal with!
>>
>> I understand their usefulness but don't agree that I should be the one to pay for wanting to do business with you!
>>
>>
>>
>> James Sheffer,
>>
>> The HigherPowered Team!
>>
>> [hidden email]          [hidden email]
>> Web Design & Development             http://www.higherpowered.com
>> phone:  469-256-0268                      
>> "We help businesses succeed on the web!"
>>        -------------------------------------------
>>
>> On Jun 25, 2012, at 3:28 PM, Carl Ketterling wrote:
>>
>>> I can't be sure, but I believe that anything you can do to encode an
>>> email address can be easily decoded by a harvester.  If you're running a
>>> business, expect to have email addressed found by spammers.  I focus on
>>> spam filtering rather than on hiding email addresses.
>>>
>>> Carl
>>>
>>> In response to this text from Patrick Larkin ([hidden email])
>>> sent on Monday, June 25, 2012 at 4:12 PM (-0400):
>>>
>>>> Hi -
>>>>
>>>> Does anyone know how these spam harvesters work?  The email
>>>> administrator freaks whenever I put email accounts on a website but it's
>>>> nearly impossible to conduct business to expect people to know how to
>>>> edit out "AT" with a @ or some other silly method.  
>>>>
>>>> I see examples on constructing the email address using javascript or
>>>> using ASCII codes to construct the "mailto" URL.  But they all seem to
>>>> assemble the "mailto" URL.  For instance, the ASCII code method works if
>>>> the harvester is just reading source but if it's actually following and
>>>> recording the links, it will get the fully assembled email address.
>>>>
>>>> So, has anyone done anything interesting with Lasso to obfuscate email
>>>> addresses?  I thought about just making a Lasso-based form but there's
>>>> too much potential for abuse given our clientele.  
>>>>
>>>> Patrick
>>>> #############################################################
>>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>>> [hidden email]
>>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>>
>>>
>>> #############################################################
>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>> [hidden email]
>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>
>> #############################################################
>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>> the mailing list Lasso
>> [hidden email]
>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>
> #############################################################
> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>  the mailing list Lasso
> [hidden email]
> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>

#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Patrick Larkin-2
I'm more worried about students sending offensive emails to their teachers using phony names.  Of course they can do that using bogus gmail accounts or something but at least they have to work a bit harder.

Regarding the email admin, he does a good job at spam filtering but is extra paranoid about things outside his bubble.  :).



On Jun 25, 2012, at 5:16 PM, Jim Sheffer <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Patrick-
>
> In the form, come up with a question that they can easily answer (but a bot would not know).
>
> Combine that with a time/date stamp and you are on your way to creating a safe email form :-)
>
> James Sheffer,
>
> The HigherPowered Team!
>
> [hidden email]          [hidden email]
> Web Design & Development             http://www.higherpowered.com
> phone:  469-256-0268                      
> "We help businesses succeed on the web!"
>         -------------------------------------------
>
> On Jun 25, 2012, at 3:55 PM, Patrick Larkin wrote:
>
>> Thanks.  Well we are not a "business" but we have thousands of employees.  And the fact that half of them are teachers and principals, I'm not too keen on the anonymity of a form email system.  I know it will be abused.  
>>
>> So the dilemma continues...
>>
>>
>>
>> On Jun 25, 2012, at 4:46 PM, Jim Sheffer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>> Patrick-
>>>
>>> I agree with Carl - Expect to have the email address found by spammers.
>>>
>>> The only "safe" way I've found is to use a form to send emails back to the client and that's not always the best way to go.
>>>
>>> Of course, I'm one of those that believes that almost ANY hoops requiring the client (visitor) to jump through are bad business.  The idea of making a potential client jump through hoops so I can run my email server a little easier seems ridiculous (I hope this doesn't start some type of "war" on the subject)!
>>> Same with "Captcha" - I can't stand sites that force me to go through that step and if I can avoid it, I'll find another company to deal with!
>>>
>>> I understand their usefulness but don't agree that I should be the one to pay for wanting to do business with you!
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> James Sheffer,
>>>
>>> The HigherPowered Team!
>>>
>>> [hidden email]          [hidden email]
>>> Web Design & Development             http://www.higherpowered.com
>>> phone:  469-256-0268                      
>>> "We help businesses succeed on the web!"
>>>       -------------------------------------------
>>>
>>> On Jun 25, 2012, at 3:28 PM, Carl Ketterling wrote:
>>>
>>>> I can't be sure, but I believe that anything you can do to encode an
>>>> email address can be easily decoded by a harvester.  If you're running a
>>>> business, expect to have email addressed found by spammers.  I focus on
>>>> spam filtering rather than on hiding email addresses.
>>>>
>>>> Carl
>>>>
>>>> In response to this text from Patrick Larkin ([hidden email])
>>>> sent on Monday, June 25, 2012 at 4:12 PM (-0400):
>>>>
>>>>> Hi -
>>>>>
>>>>> Does anyone know how these spam harvesters work?  The email
>>>>> administrator freaks whenever I put email accounts on a website but it's
>>>>> nearly impossible to conduct business to expect people to know how to
>>>>> edit out "AT" with a @ or some other silly method.  
>>>>>
>>>>> I see examples on constructing the email address using javascript or
>>>>> using ASCII codes to construct the "mailto" URL.  But they all seem to
>>>>> assemble the "mailto" URL.  For instance, the ASCII code method works if
>>>>> the harvester is just reading source but if it's actually following and
>>>>> recording the links, it will get the fully assembled email address.
>>>>>
>>>>> So, has anyone done anything interesting with Lasso to obfuscate email
>>>>> addresses?  I thought about just making a Lasso-based form but there's
>>>>> too much potential for abuse given our clientele.  
>>>>>
>>>>> Patrick
>>>>> #############################################################
>>>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> #############################################################
>>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>>> [hidden email]
>>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>>
>>> #############################################################
>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>> [hidden email]
>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>>
>> #############################################################
>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>> the mailing list Lasso
>> [hidden email]
>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>
> #############################################################
> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>  the mailing list Lasso
> [hidden email]
> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>
#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Carl Ketterling
Patrick,

I started to write...
>For what it's worth, I had a bogus email address on almost every page of
>our site for years in hopes of finding harvesters.  I don't think I've
>ever received/blocked an email to that address.

After I checked the email server, that email address is rejected almost
twice as often as the next invalid address.  Maybe you *should* encrypt
the email addresses on your site.

Carl



In response to this text from Patrick Larkin ([hidden email])
sent on Monday, June 25, 2012 at 6:00 PM (-0400):

>I'm more worried about students sending offensive emails to their
>teachers using phony names.  Of course they can do that using bogus
>gmail accounts or something but at least they have to work a bit harder.
>
>Regarding the email admin, he does a good job at spam filtering but is
>extra paranoid about things outside his bubble.  :).
>
>
>
>On Jun 25, 2012, at 5:16 PM, Jim Sheffer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Patrick-
>>
>> In the form, come up with a question that they can easily answer (but
>a bot would not know).
>>
>> Combine that with a time/date stamp and you are on your way to
>creating a safe email form :-)
>>
>> James Sheffer,
>>
>> The HigherPowered Team!
>>
>> [hidden email]          [hidden email]
>> Web Design & Development             http://www.higherpowered.com
>> phone:  469-256-0268                      
>> "We help businesses succeed on the web!"
>>         -------------------------------------------
>>
>> On Jun 25, 2012, at 3:55 PM, Patrick Larkin wrote:
>>
>>> Thanks.  Well we are not a "business" but we have thousands of
>employees.  And the fact that half of them are teachers and principals,
>I'm not too keen on the anonymity of a form email system.  I know it
>will be abused.  
>>>
>>> So the dilemma continues...
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Jun 25, 2012, at 4:46 PM, Jim Sheffer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Patrick-
>>>>
>>>> I agree with Carl - Expect to have the email address found by spammers.
>>>>
>>>> The only "safe" way I've found is to use a form to send emails back
>to the client and that's not always the best way to go.
>>>>
>>>> Of course, I'm one of those that believes that almost ANY hoops
>requiring the client (visitor) to jump through are bad business.  The
>idea of making a potential client jump through hoops so I can run my
>email server a little easier seems ridiculous (I hope this doesn't start
>some type of "war" on the subject)!
>>>> Same with "Captcha" - I can't stand sites that force me to go
>through that step and if I can avoid it, I'll find another company to
>deal with!
>>>>
>>>> I understand their usefulness but don't agree that I should be the
>one to pay for wanting to do business with you!
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> James Sheffer,
>>>>
>>>> The HigherPowered Team!
>>>>
>>>> [hidden email]          [hidden email]
>>>> Web Design & Development             http://www.higherpowered.com
>>>> phone:  469-256-0268                      
>>>> "We help businesses succeed on the web!"
>>>>       -------------------------------------------
>>>>
>>>> On Jun 25, 2012, at 3:28 PM, Carl Ketterling wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> I can't be sure, but I believe that anything you can do to encode an
>>>>> email address can be easily decoded by a harvester.  If you're running a
>>>>> business, expect to have email addressed found by spammers.  I focus on
>>>>> spam filtering rather than on hiding email addresses.
>>>>>
>>>>> Carl
>>>>>
>>>>> In response to this text from Patrick Larkin ([hidden email])
>>>>> sent on Monday, June 25, 2012 at 4:12 PM (-0400):
>>>>>
>>>>>> Hi -
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Does anyone know how these spam harvesters work?  The email
>>>>>> administrator freaks whenever I put email accounts on a website
but it's
>>>>>> nearly impossible to conduct business to expect people to know how to
>>>>>> edit out "AT" with a @ or some other silly method.  
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I see examples on constructing the email address using javascript or
>>>>>> using ASCII codes to construct the "mailto" URL.  But they all seem to
>>>>>> assemble the "mailto" URL.  For instance, the ASCII code method
works if

>>>>>> the harvester is just reading source but if it's actually following and
>>>>>> recording the links, it will get the fully assembled email address.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> So, has anyone done anything interesting with Lasso to obfuscate email
>>>>>> addresses?  I thought about just making a Lasso-based form but there's
>>>>>> too much potential for abuse given our clientele.  
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Patrick
>>>>>> #############################################################
>>>>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>>>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>>>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> #############################################################
>>>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>>>
>>>> #############################################################
>>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>>> [hidden email]
>>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>>>
>>> #############################################################
>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>> [hidden email]
>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>
>> #############################################################
>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>  the mailing list Lasso
>> [hidden email]
>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>
>#############################################################
>This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>  the mailing list Lasso
>[hidden email]
>To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>


#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

stevepiercy
In reply to this post by Patrick Larkin-2
There is no holy grail when it concerns safeguarding messages
sent via email.  Email itself is not a secure message transport mechanism.

Nonetheless, there are many techniques to secure forms that send
email, which I presented in Amsterdam.  These techniques will
block automated evil harvesters almost 100%.

http://lasso.2283332.n4.nabble.com/Anti-form-spam-techniques-summary-and-examples-tt3125964.html
http://lasso.2283332.n4.nabble.com/Blocking-Spam-via-Forms-tp3114460.html
http://lasso.2283332.n4.nabble.com/Event-Schedule-Problem-tp3113297p3113302.html

Most importantly do not use CAPTCHA's.  Every time you use a
CAPTCHA, god kills a kitten.

Anyway, as I alluded to at the beginning, if the employee ever
sends email outside of the school, you can be fairly certain
that it will eventually get abused by a disgruntled little brat.

In any system, unless you use an online forum or chat system
which requires both the sender and recipient to authenticate and
verify their identity, you will never prevent the case of kids
or adults being jerks.

--steve


On 6/25/12 at 4:55 PM, [hidden email] (Patrick Larkin) pronounced:

>Thanks.  Well we are not a "business" but we have thousands of
>employees.  And the fact that half of them are teachers and
>principals, I'm not too keen on the anonymity of a form email
>system.  I know it will be abused.
>So the dilemma continues...
>
>
>
>On Jun 25, 2012, at 4:46 PM, Jim Sheffer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>>Patrick-
>>
>>I agree with Carl - Expect to have the email address found by spammers.
>>
>>The only "safe" way I've found is to use a form to send emails back to the
>client and that's not always the best way to go.
>>
>>Of course, I'm one of those that believes that almost ANY hoops requiring the
>client (visitor) to jump through are bad business.  The idea of
>making a potential client jump through hoops so I can run my
>email server a little easier seems ridiculous (I hope this
>doesn't start some type of "war" on the subject)!
>>Same with "Captcha" - I can't stand sites that force me to go through that step
>and if I can avoid it, I'll find another company to deal with!
>>
>>I understand their usefulness but don't agree that I should be the one to pay
>for wanting to do business with you!
>>
>>
>>
>>James Sheffer,
>>
>>The HigherPowered Team!
>>
>>[hidden email]          [hidden email]
>>Web Design & Development             http://www.higherpowered.com
>>phone:  469-256-0268                       "We help businesses
>>succeed on the web!"
>>-------------------------------------------
>>
>>On Jun 25, 2012, at 3:28 PM, Carl Ketterling wrote:
>>
>>> I can't be sure, but I believe that anything you can do to encode an
>>> email address can be easily decoded by a harvester.  If you're running a
>>> business, expect to have email addressed found by spammers.  I focus on
>>> spam filtering rather than on hiding email addresses.
>>>   Carl
>>>   In response to this text from Patrick Larkin ([hidden email])
>>> sent on Monday, June 25, 2012 at 4:12 PM (-0400):
>>>
>>>> Hi -
>>>>   Does anyone know how these spam harvesters work?  The email
>>>> administrator freaks whenever I put email accounts on a website but it's
>>>> nearly impossible to conduct business to expect people to know how to
>>>>  edit out "AT" with a @ or some other silly method.    I
>>>>see examples on constructing the email address using
>>>>javascript or
>>>> using ASCII codes to construct the "mailto" URL.  But they all seem to
>>>> assemble the "mailto" URL.  For instance, the ASCII code method works if
>>>> the harvester is just reading source but if it's actually following and
>>>> recording the links, it will get the fully assembled email address.
>>>>   So, has anyone done anything interesting with Lasso to
>>>>obfuscate email
>>>> addresses?  I thought about just making a Lasso-based form but there's
>>>>  too much potential for abuse given our clientele.    Patrick
>>>> #############################################################
>>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>>> [hidden email]
>>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>>    #############################################################
>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>> [hidden email]
>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>
>>#############################################################
>>This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>the mailing list Lasso
>>[hidden email]
>>To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>
>#############################################################
>This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>the mailing list Lasso
>[hidden email]
>To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
-- --
Steve Piercy               Web Site Builder              
Soquel, CA
<[hidden email]>                  <http://www.StevePiercy.com/>

#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Robert Carpenter
In reply to this post by Patrick Larkin-2
Patrick-

There simply is no 100% failsafe - eventually, some ass-clown will figure out a way to deliver spam to your email addresses.

That said, I've got a couple of javascripts that we've used for a long time to leverage the fact that the harvesters are all about high-volume scanning, and as a result generally don't process javascript.

(As an aside - man, this stuff is oooold, looks like it predates jquery! But it's worked really well for us for a long time, so I'll put a rewrite for this on the "in my copious free time" list)

function addy(user, display){
        server = 'domain.com'
        open1 = '<a href="ma'
        open2 = 'ilto:'
        open3 = '">'
        close1 = '</a>'
       
        if(!display){
                var showme = user + '\x40' + server;
        }else{
                var showme = display;
        }
        var theAddy = open1 + open2 + user + '\x40' + server + open3 + showme + close1;
        //document.write(theAddy);
        return theAddy;
        }


function writeEmail() {
        var emlArray = new Array();
        emlArray = getElementsByClass(document.getElementById("main"),"eml","span");
        for (i = 0; i < emlArray.length; i++) {
                email = emlArray[i];
                email.innerHTML = addy((email.getAttribute('id')),(email.getAttribute('title')));
        }
}

Usage:

Set writeEmail() to fire on document.load. For each mailto link you want, add some html that looks like this:

<span class="eml" id="username" title"link text you want to display" >default text for non-js user agents (something like "user (at) domain (dot) com" or just nothing)</span>

Again, if I were writing this in 2012, it would probably look quite a bit different, but it should give a solid starting point.

Also, there's nothing to say that harvesters won't decide tomorrow that they really should be evaluating javascript, at which point this script fails, but it's been working well for quite some time, and AFAIK, the economics of spam haven't changed much lately.

Bon Chance!

-Robert-

On Jun 25, 2012, at 3:00 PM, Patrick Larkin wrote:

> I'm more worried about students sending offensive emails to their teachers using phony names.  Of course they can do that using bogus gmail accounts or something but at least they have to work a bit harder.
>
> Regarding the email admin, he does a good job at spam filtering but is extra paranoid about things outside his bubble.  :).
>
>
>
> On Jun 25, 2012, at 5:16 PM, Jim Sheffer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Patrick-
>>
>> In the form, come up with a question that they can easily answer (but a bot would not know).
>>
>> Combine that with a time/date stamp and you are on your way to creating a safe email form :-)
>>
>> James Sheffer,
>>
>> The HigherPowered Team!
>>
>> [hidden email]          [hidden email]
>> Web Design & Development             http://www.higherpowered.com
>> phone:  469-256-0268                      
>> "We help businesses succeed on the web!"
>>        -------------------------------------------
>>
>> On Jun 25, 2012, at 3:55 PM, Patrick Larkin wrote:
>>
>>> Thanks.  Well we are not a "business" but we have thousands of employees.  And the fact that half of them are teachers and principals, I'm not too keen on the anonymity of a form email system.  I know it will be abused.  
>>>
>>> So the dilemma continues...
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Jun 25, 2012, at 4:46 PM, Jim Sheffer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Patrick-
>>>>
>>>> I agree with Carl - Expect to have the email address found by spammers.
>>>>
>>>> The only "safe" way I've found is to use a form to send emails back to the client and that's not always the best way to go.
>>>>
>>>> Of course, I'm one of those that believes that almost ANY hoops requiring the client (visitor) to jump through are bad business.  The idea of making a potential client jump through hoops so I can run my email server a little easier seems ridiculous (I hope this doesn't start some type of "war" on the subject)!
>>>> Same with "Captcha" - I can't stand sites that force me to go through that step and if I can avoid it, I'll find another company to deal with!
>>>>
>>>> I understand their usefulness but don't agree that I should be the one to pay for wanting to do business with you!
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> James Sheffer,
>>>>
>>>> The HigherPowered Team!
>>>>
>>>> [hidden email]          [hidden email]
>>>> Web Design & Development             http://www.higherpowered.com
>>>> phone:  469-256-0268                      
>>>> "We help businesses succeed on the web!"
>>>>      -------------------------------------------
>>>>
>>>> On Jun 25, 2012, at 3:28 PM, Carl Ketterling wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> I can't be sure, but I believe that anything you can do to encode an
>>>>> email address can be easily decoded by a harvester.  If you're running a
>>>>> business, expect to have email addressed found by spammers.  I focus on
>>>>> spam filtering rather than on hiding email addresses.
>>>>>
>>>>> Carl
>>>>>
>>>>> In response to this text from Patrick Larkin ([hidden email])
>>>>> sent on Monday, June 25, 2012 at 4:12 PM (-0400):
>>>>>
>>>>>> Hi -
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Does anyone know how these spam harvesters work?  The email
>>>>>> administrator freaks whenever I put email accounts on a website but it's
>>>>>> nearly impossible to conduct business to expect people to know how to
>>>>>> edit out "AT" with a @ or some other silly method.  
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I see examples on constructing the email address using javascript or
>>>>>> using ASCII codes to construct the "mailto" URL.  But they all seem to
>>>>>> assemble the "mailto" URL.  For instance, the ASCII code method works if
>>>>>> the harvester is just reading source but if it's actually following and
>>>>>> recording the links, it will get the fully assembled email address.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> So, has anyone done anything interesting with Lasso to obfuscate email
>>>>>> addresses?  I thought about just making a Lasso-based form but there's
>>>>>> too much potential for abuse given our clientele.  
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Patrick
>>>>>> #############################################################
>>>>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>>>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>>>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> #############################################################
>>>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>>>
>>>> #############################################################
>>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>>> [hidden email]
>>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>>>
>>> #############################################################
>>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>>> the mailing list Lasso
>>> [hidden email]
>>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>
>> #############################################################
>> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>> the mailing list Lasso
>> [hidden email]
>> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
>> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>>
> #############################################################
> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>  the mailing list Lasso
> [hidden email]
> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>

#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

RE: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Rick Draper-2
In reply to this post by Patrick Larkin-2
Hi Patrick,

I am confused about your objectives, based on the subject of the original post and other replies...

Do you want to inhibit harvesting by bots and other such tools or misuse of communication with staff by others?

Very best regards,

Rick


#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Tim Taplin
I believe the goal is to provide email links so that people can communicate with each other via their own email clients and accounts as opposed being tempted to fill out a form with bogus info to be sent to an end user. The challenge is protecting those email links so that they do not get harvested by spammers.

Tim Taplin

On Jun 25, 2012, at 5:13 PM, Rick Draper wrote:

> Hi Patrick,
>
> I am confused about your objectives, based on the subject of the original post and other replies...
>
> Do you want to inhibit harvesting by bots and other such tools or misuse of communication with staff by others?
>
> Very best regards,
>
> Rick
>
>
> #############################################################
> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>  the mailing list Lasso
> [hidden email]
> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>

#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

RE: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Rick Draper-2
> The challenge is protecting those email links so that they do not get harvested by spammers.

Thanks, Tim.

Well, while agreeing with others comments about nothing being 100% effective, the base64 encoding technique I posted previously means that at least the underlying HTML does not show the true email address, but allows the user to click on the link to initiate an email from their client.

Very best regards,

Rick


#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Patrick Larkin-2
In reply to this post by Rick Draper-2
I want to inhibit harvesting preferably by not using an email form.  Forms are way too easy
for kids to be idiots.*
 *not backed by empirical proof.

On Jun 25, 2012, at 7:13 PM, "Rick Draper" <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi Patrick,
>
> I am confused about your objectives, based on the subject of the original post and other replies...
>
> Do you want to inhibit harvesting by bots and other such tools or misuse of communication with staff by others?
>
> Very best regards,
>
> Rick
>
>
> #############################################################
> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to for
>  the mailing list Lasso
> [hidden email]
> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>
#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

RE: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Rick Draper-2
> I want to inhibit harvesting preferably by not using an email form.  Forms are way too easy for kids to be idiots.*  *not backed by empirical proof.

Hi Patrick,

This will do what you need then...

Email: <a class="enc_value">[encode_base64('[hidden email])]</a>

When the page renders, the base64 encoded email address appears normally..

        // decodes obfuscated e-mails
        $(". enc_value ").each(function(){
                var addr = $.base64Decode($(this).text());
                $(this).attr("href", "mailto:" + addr).text(addr);
        });


Very best regards,

Rick


#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Jonathan Guthrie-3
Rick that's an excellent option... means that it should be less readable by a scraper, and no problem for a real user.

One question however - how does this method work in an environment of accessibility legislation?


On 2012-06-25, at 9:25 PM, Rick Draper wrote:

>> I want to inhibit harvesting preferably by not using an email form.  Forms are way too easy for kids to be idiots.*  *not backed by empirical proof.
>
> Hi Patrick,
>
> This will do what you need then...
>
> Email: <a class="enc_value">[encode_base64('[hidden email])]</a>
>
> When the page renders, the base64 encoded email address appears normally..
>
> // decodes obfuscated e-mails
> $(". enc_value ").each(function(){
> var addr = $.base64Decode($(this).text());
> $(this).attr("href", "mailto:" + addr).text(addr);
> });
>
>
> Very best regards,
>
> Rick
>
>
> #############################################################
> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>  the mailing list Lasso
> [hidden email]
> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>

Jono

----------------------------
Jonathan Guthrie
[hidden email]
LassoSoft Inc.
+1 888-286-7753 ext 708

#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

RE: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Rick Draper-2
> One question however - how does this method work in an environment of accessibility legislation?

Hi Jono,

We are not impacted by this in the applications in which we operate, so it's not been a consideration to date.  However, I expect that it may be acceptable to enable users with a disability to take an action to expose the decoded text so that it can be computer read.

Very best regards,

Rick


#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Hiding email addresses from harvesters

Patrick Larkin-2
In reply to this post by Rick Draper-2
Thanks.  When I try and integrate this into my tag, I get the "No tag, type or constant was defined under the name "[encode_base64"" error.  

The line in question is:

#out
+= '<tr><td>'
+ $DisplayName
+'</td><td>'
+$title+'</td><td>'
+$phone
+'</td><td>
<a class="enc_value">'+[encode_base64('[hidden email]')]
+'</a></td></tr>



One other method I was looking at was writing the mailto link like so:

<a href="&#109;&#097;&#105;&#108;&#116;&#111;:'+$username+'&#064;beth.k12.pa.us">Email</a>

which also renders fine but the source is ASCII gobbledigook.  So my original question remains: should I even bother because I don't know whether harvesters follow links and spider a site for the rendered results or if they read source.




Patrick Larkin
Developer/Administrator of Special Systems / Webmaster
Bethlehem Area School District




On Jun 25, 2012, at 9:25 PM, Rick Draper wrote:

>> I want to inhibit harvesting preferably by not using an email form.  Forms are way too easy for kids to be idiots.*  *not backed by empirical proof.
>
> Hi Patrick,
>
> This will do what you need then...
>
> Email: <a class="enc_value">[encode_base64('[hidden email])]</a>
>
> When the page renders, the base64 encoded email address appears normally..
>
> // decodes obfuscated e-mails
> $(". enc_value ").each(function(){
> var addr = $.base64Decode($(this).text());
> $(this).attr("href", "mailto:" + addr).text(addr);
> });
>
>
> Very best regards,
>
> Rick
>
>
> #############################################################
> This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
>  the mailing list Lasso
> [hidden email]
> To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
> Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
>

#############################################################
This message is sent to you because you are subscribed to
  the mailing list Lasso
[hidden email]
To unsubscribe, E-mail to: <[hidden email]>
Send administrative queries to  <[hidden email]>
12